JOHN POTOTSCHNIK FINE ART

“Family Roots” creative process

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The color study for this painting was done in October 2017, and the final painting was birthed a year later. I like to let the studies percolate on my mind for a while before committing to a larger work. Typically, I have found working on several paintings at a time results in better overall paintings, for there is time to let them sit a while, look at them with fresh eyes, and stay enthused and energized. This way of working certainly extends the completion time of a painting considerably, but it works for me.

This week I would like to share with you the process I went through to create “Family Roots”.  (Click images to enlarge)

Photo Reference - This is the photo reference that was inspiration for the the painting. Actually, it's the photo on the right that I found most inspiring. The photo on the left was from a totally different area but in trying to come up with a concept, I placed a number of photos along side the first in order to see what worked. So, these two photos together   were the foundation of the color study...and eventually the larger work.

Photo Reference – This is the photo reference that was inspiration for the painting. Actually, it’s the photo on the right that I found most inspiring. The photo on the left is from a totally different area, but in trying to come up with a concept, I placed a number of photos along side the first in order to see what worked. So, these two photos together were the foundation of the color study…and eventually the larger work.

 

"Family Roots" - 3.75" x 7.5" - Oil on gessoed paper. Color studies on archival sheets of paper, 5.5" x 8.5", are at the heart of all preliminary work. It is here I work out the concept, composition, drawing, values and color.

“Family Roots” (Study) – 3.75″ x 7.5″ – Oil on gessoed paper. Color studies on archival sheets of paper, 5.5″ x 8.5″, are at the heart of all the preliminary work I do. It is here I work out the concept, composition, drawing, values and color. There is not a lot of time invested in these, so if they don’t work out, it is not a great loss. Typically, I file the studies in notebooks for future reference.

 

My color studies are extremely important to me. Here I am with 1000 of them...working on book eleven. Recently I have begun offering some of these for purchase to my monthly newsletter subscribers. They are usually snatched up quickly.

My color studies are extremely important to me. Here I am with over 1000 of them…currently working on book eleven. Recently I have begun offering some of these for purchase to my monthly newsletter subscribers. They are usually snatched up quickly.

 

Step 2 - A 12" x 24" gessoed hardboard panel with an umber wash was chosen for the larger work. These panels are archival/acid free boards produced by Jack Richeson & Co. If the study is acceptable, then it's important that the proportions of the larger surface are of the same proportion as the study.

Step 2 – A 12″ x 24″ gessoed hardboard panel with an umber wash was chosen for the larger work. These panels are archival/acid free boards produced by Jack Richeson & Co. If the study is acceptable, then it’s important that the proportions of the larger surface are of the same proportion as the study, if not, the composition of the study will be meaningless.

 

Step 3 - I took a painting workshop with Joe Paquet last year and he stressed the importance, when beginning a painting, of only painting the shadow patterns...making them connect, harmonious, and  rhythmatic. Using a mixture of Cobalt Blue, Ivory Black and White, the various degrees of value are created. With the shadows and their values established, color followed.

Step 3 – I took a painting workshop with Joe Paquet last year and he stressed the importance, when beginning a painting, to only look for and paint the shadow patterns…making them connect, harmonious, and rhythmatic. Using a recommended mixture of Cobalt Blue, Ivory Black and White, the various degrees of shadow value for this piece were created. With the shadows and their values established, color followed.

 

Step 3 - The painting surface is now covered, now it's just a matter of refining and bringing it to life.

Step 4 – The painting surface is now covered, now it’s just a matter of refining and bringing it to life.

 

"Family Roots" - 12" x 24" - Oil. The palette used for this painting: Titanium White, Cobalt Blue, Cadmium Red, Burnt Siena, Yellow Ochre, Cadmium Yellow Light, Ivory Black.

“Family Roots” – 12″ x 24″ – Oil. The palette used for this painting: Titanium White, Cobalt Blue, Cadmium Red, Burnt Siena, Yellow Ochre, Cadmium Yellow Light, Ivory Black.

 

This painting is available for purchase from my studio. If interested, please contact me:

john@pototschnik.com

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NEXT WEEK: An interview with Ann Kraft Walker

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The video and accompanying book, shown here, along with my first video, "Limited Palette Landscape", include everything I've taught in my workshops. You can now take my oil painting workshop right in the comfort of your home, and for a lot less money than physically being present.

The video and accompanying book, shown here, along with my first video, “Limited Palette Landscape”, include everything I’ve taught in my workshops. You can now take my oil painting workshop right in the comfort of your home, and for a lot less money than physically being present. (Click image to learn more)

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John Pototschnik is an Art Renewal Center Living Master
To view his art and bio, please click HERE

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